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Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada
Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada

(AMECC)

Conseil des Examinateurs en Médecine Douces du Canada

Details on the education and examination requirements for Alternative Medicine Practitioners and reasons why Alternative Medicine can play a vital role in the healthcare system.

Interest in alternative medicine has grown significantly over the last decade, creating a demand for alternative practitioners. Three elements must be present to ensure that these healthcare professionals do not pose a threat to public health:

1.
Alternative Medicine practitioners must be educated at medical colleges that have been accredited by an agency recognized by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) .;

2.
Practitioners must be examined by a national examining board that sets high standards for eligibility and provides standardized test administration; board examinations must be developed in accordance with national testing standards.

3.
Practitioners must be licensed, required to take continuing education, and subject to peer review.

Twenty eight Alternative Medicine medical colleges in Canada are currently accredited by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) . .

The Alternative Medicine education follows a path similar to that of medical doctors (MDs). Applicants enter Alternative Medicine medical school after receiving a baccalaureate degree (usually pre-med) from a four-year college. Students complete two years of post-graduate basic science coursework then have two to three years of didactic and clinical training, including time spent in supervised patient care.

The Canadian Council of Examiners are the local provincial councils used to examine all Alternative Medicine practitioners who want to be licensed in provinces that license or not, in there respective professions,
Better to be Prepared!
After graduation from the accredited Alternative Medicine medical college and passage of Examinations, candidates apply to one of the jurisdictions that have laws that enable licensed Alternative Medicine physicians to serve their communities as providers of primary care medicine in Canada. Licensed Alternative Medicine physicians are required to obtain continuing education and are subject to peer review.

Alternative Medicine can play a vital, cost-effective role in the healthcare system:

1.
Alternative Medicine physicians are primary care providers who treat patients for a variety of conditions, using therapies that are non-invasive, safe, and effective. More patients are demanding these kinds of treatment options, and the cost of Alternative Medicine care is minimal when compared to the skyrocketing costs of drugs.

2.
Because Alternative Medicine places significant emphasis on prevention (not merely on screening for pre-existing conditions), it can help stem the increasing incidence of chronic disease. For a small expenditure now, significant costs can be prevented later.

3.
Alternative Medicine provides vital adjunctive care when a patient is being treated by a medical doctor for a serious condition. For example, Alternative Medicine can help allay the severe side effects of precribed medcation and can provide support for better healing. A study done recently showed that this valuable care accounts for only 2% of the cost of treatments.

4.
Alternative Medicine practitioners can meet the growing shortage of healthcare providers in rural areas. Efforts are under way to allow Alternative Medicine practitioners to be granted the same kinds of loan repayment options to encourage participation in rural, veteran's, and Indian health programs that are available for MDs, DCs, and other eligible providers.

5.
A patient who is rushed through appointments and feels that her/his doctor does not listen is more likely to file a lawsuit in the case of a mistake than is a patient who feels a respectful partnership with her/his physician. Alternative Medicine practitioners spend a great deal of time listening to their patients, attending to their emotional, mental, and spiritual needs as well as to their physical symptoms. Cases of malpractice are extremely rare in the Alternative Medicine profession.

Alternative Medicine ORGANIZATION WEBSITES

Canadian Council of Osteopathic Examiners (CCOE)
http://www.ccoe.ca

Conseil Canadien des Examinateurs en Ostéopathie (CCOE)
http://www.ccoe.ca

Canadian Council of Massotherapeutic Examiners (CCME)
http://www.ccme.ca

Conseil Canadien des Examinateurs en Massothérapie (CCME)
http://www.ccme.ca

Naturopathic Medicine Council of Canada (NMCC)
http://www.nmcc.info

Conseil des Examinateurs en Médecine Naturopathique du Canada (NMCC)
http://www.nmcc.info

Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners (CCNE)
http://www.ccne.ca

Conseil Canadien des Examinateurs en Naturopathie (CCNE)
http://www.ccne.ca

Canadian Council of Psychotherapeutic Examiners (CCPE)
http://www.ccpex.ca

Conseil Canadien des Examinateurs en Psychothérapie (CCPE)
http://www.ccpex.ca

Canadian Council of Sports Medicine (CCSM)
http://www.ccsm.info

Conseil Canadien en Médecine Sportive
(CCSM)

Canadian Council of Sports Medicine
Examiners
(CCEMS)
http://www.ccems.info

Conseil Canadien des Examinateurs en Médecine Sportive (CCEMS)
http://www.ccems.info

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

During the first 2 ½ - 3 years of medical school, the education of Alternative Medicine Physicians follows a path similar to that of medical doctors (MDs). Students in both allopathic and Alternative Medicine medical colleges receive extensive training in the biomedical sciences, and in physical, clinical, and lab diagnosis. Both receive training in emergency procedures, public health, and principles of pharmacology. The Alternative Medicine colleges use standard medical texts for this phase of the training. The paths of Alternative Medicine physicians medical education and allopathic medical education diverge after this point. MDs learn how to prescribe drugs and perform or refer for surgery. Alternative Medicine physicians learn how to use herbs, clinical nutrition, physical osteopathic medicine (e.g., hydrotherapy, soft tissue massage, osseous manipulation, etc.), homeopathy, and mind-body medicine.

Four keys differences distinguish the Alternative Medicine Physicians approach from the approach used by allopathic doctors (MDs):

Emphasis on prevention

Search for and treatment of the cause of illness (as compared to an approach that treats the symptoms of the illness)

Individualized treatment (e.g. two patients being treated for the same pathology may have completely different treatment protocols).

A goal of removing obstacles to the body's own innate healing processes (as compared to the idea that “cure” must come from external sources)

Alternative Medicine Physicians License Requirements

Alternative Medicine physicians: Initial License Requirements

Submit a Alternative Medicine physicians license application & pay the required license fee;
Possess a good moral and professional reputation;
Be physically and mentally fit to practice Alternative Medicine;
Graduate from a Alternative Medicine medical college that is accredited by the Council or another such accrediting agency recognized by the federal government; or graduate from a foreign country Alternative Medicine medical college that possesses equivalent qualifications; and
Successfully complete the examinations.

The Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) 's mission is to ensure the high quality of alternative medicine education in Canada through the voluntary accreditation of four-year, graduate-level programs in alternative medicine. Students and graduates of programs accredited or pre-accredited (candidacy) by AMECC are eligible to apply for the Alternative Medicine physicians licensing examinations administered by the Canadian Council of Examiners.

Founded in 1991, is accepted as the programmatic accrediting agency for Alternative Medicine physicians education and programs in Canada, by the Canadian National Alternative Medicine Physicians Professional Syndicates. AMECC. advocates for high standards in Alternative Medicine education, and its grant of accreditation to a college or program indicates prospective students and the public may have confidence in the college or program. The AMECC is the national accrediting agency for programs leading to the Doctor degrees in Alternative Medicine.

An accreditation handbook, containing AMECC standards, policies, procedures, and governing documents, is available for $20, prepaid. A free PDF version is available by e-mail upon request. The PDF file may be opened and printed with Adobe Acrobat Reader, a free download.

AMECC also certifies postdoctoral programs in Alternative Medicine. Among these programs are Alternative Medicine physicians residencies that provide licensed Alternative Medicine physicians with postgraduate training in Alternative Medicine family care and other specialties. A manual containing AMECC's standards for residency programs may be ordered for $15, prepaid. A free PDF version is available by e-mail.

The Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) abides by the CPMDQ Code of Good Practice.

The accredited and candidate of Alternative Medicine Physicians programs, as well as the certified residency programs, are listed on the links page. After accessing the links page, click the name of the program or its logo to go to the Website for the college or university that offers the program.

For frequently asked questions, click "FAQs" on the menu of each respective professional examination council.

AMECCs next meeting will be held April 9& 10, 2005, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Professional Regulation

Professional regulatory bodies have been delegated the authority to govern professional practice of their members in the public interest. One of their key functions is to ensure members practise competently and ethically. All regulatory bodies administer public complaint processes. Additional information about the roles and responsibilities of the professional regulatory bodies and how to make a complaint about a member of a regulated health professional in your province can be found in the list below.



CONTACT;

Dr Peter Véniez, Ph.D., N.D.

drveniez@cpmdq.com

Pour visionner le site original avec ses liens
Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC)
Retour au sommet
Canadian Council of Osteopathic Examiners (CCOE)
Details on the education and examination requirements for osteopathic doctors and reasons why osteopathic medicine can play a vital role in the healthcare system.

Interest in alternative medicine has grown significantly over the last decade, creating a demand for alternative practitioners. Three elements must be present to ensure that these healthcare professionals do not pose a threat to public health:

1.
Practitioners must be educated at medical colleges that have been accredited by an agency recognized by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC).;

2.
Practitioners must be examined by a national examining board that sets high standards for eligibility and provides standardized test administration; board examinations must be developed in accordance with national testing standards; and

3.
Practitioners must be licensed, required to take continuing education, and subject to peer review.


One osteopathic medical college in Canada is currently accredited by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC).. The CCNE is the only osteopathic accrediting body recognized by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC).

The education osteopathic doctors (DOs) follows a path similar to that of medical doctors (MDs). Applicants enter osteopathic medical school after receiving a baccalaureate degree (usually pre-med) from a four-year college. Students complete two years of post-graduate basic science coursework then have two to three years of didactic and clinical training, including time spent in supervised patient care.

The Canadian Council of Osteopathic Examiners (CCOE) uses the CCOEX to examine all osteopathic physicians who want to be licensed in provinces that license NDs. The Canadian Council of Osteopathic Examiners (CCOEX) are criterion-referenced examinations. Five Part I - Basic Science Examinations cover anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, immunology, and pathology. The Part I Examinations are taken after the second year of training. Eleven Part II - Clinical Science Examinations cover diagnosis using physical examination and lab testing, emergency and medical procedures, as well as osteopathic treatment modalities (botanical medicine, homeopathy, clinical nutrition, osteopathic physical medicine, counseling & health psychology). The CCOEX examinations are developed according to all the guidelines set forth in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing.

After graduation from the accredited osteopathic medical college and passage of Part II - Clinical Science Examinations, candidates apply to one of the jurisdictions that have laws that enable licensed osteopathic physicians to serve their communities as providers of primary care medicine in Canada. Licensed D.O.’s are required to obtain continuing education and are subject to peer review.

Osteopathic medicine can play a vital, cost-effective role in the healthcare system:

1.
Osteopathic physicians are primary care providers who treat patients for a variety of conditions, using therapies that are non-invasive, safe, and effective. More patients are demanding these kinds of treatment options, and the cost of osteopathic care is minimal when compared to the skyrocketing costs of drugs.




2.
Because osteopathic medicine places significant emphasis on prevention (not merely on screening for pre-existing conditions), it can help stem the increasing incidence of chronic disease. For a small expenditure now, significant costs can be prevented later.




3.
Osteopathic medicine provides vital adjunctive care when a patient is being treated by a medical doctor for a serious condition. For example, naturopathic medicine can help allay the severe side effects of chemotherapy and can provide support for better healing. A study done recently showed that this valuable care accounts for only 2% of the cost of cancer treatment.




4.
DO’s can meet the growing shortage of healthcare providers in rural areas. Efforts are under way to allow osteopathic doctors to be granted the same kinds of loan repayment options to encourage participation in rural, veteran’s, and Indian health programs that are available for MDs, DCs, and other eligible providers.




5.
A patient who is rushed through appointments and feels that her/his doctor does not listen is more likely to file a lawsuit in the case of a mistake than is a patient who feels a respectful partnership with her/his physician. DO’s spend a great deal of time listening to their patients, attending to their emotional, mental, and spiritual needs as well as to their physical symptoms. Cases of malpractice are extremely rare in the osteopathic profession.




OSTEOPATHIC ORGANIZATION WEBSITES

Alternative Medecine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC)

Canadian College of Osteopathic Medicine (CCOM)

Conseil des Examinateurs en Ostéopathie du Québec (CEOQ)

Collège D'Ostéopathie du Québec a Montreal (COQM)




BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

During the first 2 ½ - 3 years of medical school, the education of osteopathic doctors (DO’s) follows a path similar to that of medical doctors (MDs). Students in both allopathic and osteopathic medical colleges receive extensive training in the biomedical sciences, and in physical, clinical, and lab diagnosis. Both receive training in emergency procedures, public health, and principles of pharmacology. The osteopathic colleges use standard medical texts for this phase of the training. The paths of osteopathic medical education and allopathic medical education diverge after this point. MDs learn how to prescribe drugs and perform or refer for surgery. DO’s learn how to use herbs, clinical nutrition, physical osteopathic medicine (e.g., hydrotherapy, soft tissue massage, osseous manipulation, etc.), homeopathy, and mind-body medicine.

Four keys differences distinguish the osteopathic approach from the approach used by allopathic doctors (MDs):

·
Emphasis on prevention


·
Search for and treatment of the cause of illness (as compared to an approach that treats the symptoms of the illness)


·
Individualized treatment (e.g. two patients being treated for the same pathology may have completely different treatment protocols)


·
A goal of removing obstacles to the body’s own innate healing processes (as compared to the idea that “cure” must come from external sources)



Osteopathic License Requirements





Osteopathic Doctor: Initial License Requirements

Submit a osteopathic license application & pay the required license fee;
Possess a good moral and professional reputation;
Be physically and mentally fit to practice osteopathic medicine;
Graduate from a osteopathic medical college that is accredited by the Council or another such accrediting agency recognized by the federal government; or graduate from a foreign country osteopathic medical college that possesses equivalent qualifications; and
Successfully complete the Canadian Council of Osteopathic Examiners (CCOE) examinations.



The Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC)'s mission is to ensure the high quality of alternative medicine education in Canada through the voluntary accreditation of four-year, graduate-level programs in alternative medicine. Students and graduates of programs accredited or pre-accredited (candidacy) by AMECC are eligible to apply for the osteopathic licensing examinations administered by the Canadian Council of Osteopathic Examiners (CCOE).

Founded in 1991, CCOE is accepted as the programmatic accrediting agency for osteopathic medical education by the osteopathic college and programs in Canada, by the Canadian National Osteopathic Professional Syndicates CNOPS, and by AMECC. CCNE advocates for high standards in osteopathic education, and its grant of accreditation to a college or program indicates prospective students and the public may have confidence in the college or program. The CCOE is the national accrediting agency for programs leading to the Doctor of Osteopathy (D.O.) degree.

An accreditation handbook, containing CCOE standards, policies, procedures, and governing documents, is available for $20, prepaid. A free PDF version is available by e-mail upon request. The PDF file may be opened and printed with Adobe Acrobat Reader, a free download.

CCOE also certifies postdoctoral programs in osteopathic medicine. Among these programs are osteopathic residencies that provide licensed osteopathic physicians with postgraduate training in osteopathic family care and other specialties. A manual containing CCOE's standards for residency programs may be ordered for $15, prepaid. A free PDF version is available by e-mail.

CCOE is a member of the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) and abides by the CPMDQ Code of Good Practice.

The accredited and candidate of osteopathic medicine programs, as well as the certified residency programs, are listed on the links page. After accessing the links page, click the name of the program or its logo to go to the Website for the college or university that offers the program.

For frequently asked questions, click "FAQs" on the menu.

CCOEs next meeting will be held April 9& 10, 2005, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

1. Can you compare the colleges? Which one is best?

We treat as confidential the information we receive from osteopathic medicine programs. All accredited programs have our recommendation, but we do not rank them. Each osteopathic college has unique qualities. We encourage prospective students to visit the campuses and to participate in the schools' student-for-a-day programs.

2. Does CCOE recognize home-study schools or external-degree programs?

Many correspondence schools offer DO degrees or diplomas. Some are exempt from provincial regulations because they claim a religious purpose or they do not recruit students from their home provinces. No correspondence programs prepare students for practice as licensed osteopathic physicians, no programs are eligible for affiliation with our agency. It is not illegal for those who obtain D.O.. or do, degrees from correspondence schools to use the initials after their names; they may not, however, legally represent themselves as physicians or engage in the practice of medicine unless they are otherwise licensed as medical practitioners. Although correspondence courses can be effective in many disciplines, osteopathic licensing agencies believe they are not effective in Osteopathy for preparing students as physicians. The Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) consider those who obtain D.O., or do, degrees from correspondence schools not to be part of the osteopathic medical profession.

3. Is there a difference between the (D.O.,) and the (d.o,) degree?

Universities and colleges may choose to call the osteopathic degree they confer either the "Doctor of Osteopathy" degree or the "Diploma of Osteopathy" degree. These are two different names for the same degree. By either name, the degree is usually abbreviated "D.O.," but an institution that refers to its osteopathic credential as the "Diploma of Osteopathy Medicine" degree may abbreviate it "d.o.," Presently, all colleges and universities with accredited or candidates of osteopathic medicine programs confer the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree in Canada. In all provinces that regulate osteopathic medicine, osteopathic physicians use the D.O., initials after their names. The D.O.,. initials are the ones more widely associated with the osteopathic medical profession and are the only ones used in the corporate seals of the Canadian Council of Osteopathic Examiners (CCOE).

4. What does "candidate for accreditation" mean?

Candidacy is a status of affiliation with us that indicates a osteopathic medicine program satisfies our agency's eligibility requirements — e.g., that it is properly organized, is adequately supported financially, has good facilities and a qualified faculty, offers an appropriate curriculum, and accurately represents itself to prospective students. Candidacy, however, is not accreditation and does not ensure eventual accreditation. We grant candidacy when a program meets our eligibility requirements, complies with our standards to the degree expected for its stage of development, and is progressing toward accreditation. If it does not achieve accreditation within five years, the program loses affiliation with us for at least one year and until deficiencies are corrected. A new program may apply for candidacy at any time, but CCOE will not grant candidacy until after at least its first academic year with students enrolled full time. A osteopathic medicine program may not be accredited until it has graduated its first class. Students and graduates of candidate programs are eligible to apply for the licensing examinations, administered by the Canadian Council of Osteopathic Examiners CCOE’s branch of each province.

5. What criteria does CCOE use in evaluating osteopathic medicine programs?

The evaluation process involves a comprehensive self-study by the program, periodic visits to the campus by CCOE teams, and ongoing monitoring. Evaluation teams have three or more trained members, with at least one a practicing osteopathic physician, another a member of the Council, and another not affiliated with the osteopathic profession, its colleges, or CCOE. Our Handbook of Accreditation for Osteopathic Medicine Programs , contains our objectives, eligibility requirements, standards, policies, procedures, Articles of Incorporation, and Bylaws. The handbook is available for on-site review and photocopying (no permission needed) at the library or an administrative office of each program affiliated with us, or it may be ordered for $20, prepaid: free by e-mail upon request.

6. Where may D.O.,’s practice?

One province allows the practice of osteopathic medicine: Saskatchewan, have licensing laws for osteopathic doctors. The scope of practice varies from province to province. In provinces without osteopathic licensing laws, many who hold the D.O.,. degree also hold other degrees, such as the Doctor of Naturopathy, Doctor of Chiropractic, or Masters in Oriental Medicine degree, or M.D., and they practice under licenses for those professions. Others offer services that do not violate their provinces medical practice acts. Most osteopathic physicians are not in the provinces that regulate the profession.

7. How is CCOE organized?

CCOE was incorporated in August 1991 under the Nonprofit Corporation Act and is recognized by the Canadian Internal Revenue Service as a Professional Syndicate nonprofit organization. Board members are elected by the board itself, who are also the organization's only voting members. Presently, two of CCOE's eleven board members are public members; a public member is not affiliated in any way with the osteopathic profession. The board has three positions for institutional member representatives, who are elected rotationally for three-year terms from among administrators and faculty members at the five accredited and candidate osteopathic medicine programs. Our Articles of Incorporation also require from four to six profession members, who must be licensed osteopathic physicians. Six profession members currently serve on the board.

8. How does someone start a new osteopathic college?

To site a new osteopathic program within an existing college or university is preferable to beginning a freestanding osteopathic medical college, unless the organizing group has the necessary assets and extensive experience in higher education administration. CCOE can refer organizations with the potential for developing a new program to consultants. Any new program, to qualify for accreditation, would likely need to be in a state or province that licenses osteopathic physicians, because students do their clinical training primarily under practicing osteopathic physicians. Additionally, provincial authorities probably would not approve a college's request to grant the D.O.,. degree in a province that does not allow the practice of osteopathic medicine.

09. May I be licensed in the Canada if I attend an overseas osteopathic college?

Because standards for osteopathic education exist other than in Canada, students who graduate from osteopathic colleges in other countries are eligible to apply for the Canadian Council of Osteopathic Examiners CCNE, examinations. The exams are administered twice a year at the provincial level by the branch of it’s Province. Students who attend an overseas school may have some course credits accepted for transfer to a Canadian school if the foreign school is a graduate-level institution and governmentally recognized. If you plan to spend the first year or two of osteopathic studies at a foreign school, you should first check with one of the Canadian Osteopathic colleges to learn if any credits may be transferred later.

10. May I be licensed in the United States if I attend osteopathic college in Canada, and vice versa?

If you graduate from a CCOE-recognized college in Canada, some states will accept your licensing application, but several will not. This is because private colleges in Canada do not all confer degrees but "diplomas," e.g., the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine diploma. Quebec is the only province which confers the degree of Doctor of Osteopathy, D.O., which is a first cycle Doctorate "degree." Some state laws have language that specifically requires an D.O. "degree." U.S. students who plan to attend osteopathic college in Canada should first check with the osteopathic licensing agencies in the states where they will practice to make sure they can apply for a license with a Canadian diploma or degree.

11. What is the difference between CCOE and the other organizations that accredit osteopathic programs?

CCOE is the organization that accredits programs which prepare students to become licensed osteopathic physicians. It is the accrediting agency accepted by the Canadian Professional Syndicates for licensed osteopathic doctors, and it is the agency recognized by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC). CCNE is also the only osteopathic accreditor with membership in the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC). Other osteopathic accrediting agencies accredit schools that do not prepare students to practice as licensed osteopathic physicians. None is recognized by the AMECC, and none of the schools or programs they accredit has institutional accreditation from a recognized regional accrediting agency. Comparing the published standards, policies, procedures, and bylaws of accrediting agencies is one way to determine their differences. For CCOE, these documents are in its Handbook.

Pour visionner le site original avec ses liens Canadian Council of Osteopathic Examiners (CCOE)
Retour au sommet
Canadian Council of Massotherapeutic Examiners (CCME)
Canadian Council of Massotherapeutic Examiners
(CCME)

Details on the education and examination requirements for Massage therapists and reasons why massotherapeutic medicine can play a vital role in the healthcare system.

Interest in alternative medicine has grown significantly over the last decade, creating a demand for alternative practitioners. Three elements must be present to ensure that these healthcare professionals do not pose a threat to public health:

1.
Practitioners must be educated at medical colleges that have been accredited by an agency recognized by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC).;

2.
Practitioners must be examined by a national examining board that sets high standards for eligibility and provides standardized test administration; board examinations must be developed in accordance with national testing standards; and

3.
Practitioners must be licensed, required to take continuing education, and subject to peer review.

One massage therapy college in Canada is currently accredited by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC).. The CCNE is the only massage therapy accrediting body recognized by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC).

The education a Massage Therapist follows a path similar to that of physiotherapists. Applicants enter massotherapy school after receiving a baccalaureate degree (usually pre-med) from a four-year college or equivalent. Students complete two years of post-graduate basic science coursework then have two to three years of didactic and clinical training, including time spent in supervised patient care.

The Canadian Council of Massotherapeutic Examiners (CCME) uses the CCMEX to examine all massage therapists who want to be licensed in provinces that license massage therapists. The Canadian Council of Massotherapeutic Examiners (CCMEX) are criterion-referenced examinations. Part I - Basic Science Examinations cover anatomy, physiology, immunology, and pathology. The Part I Examinations are taken after the second year of training. Part II - Clinical Science Examinations cover diagnosis using physical examination and lab testing, emergency and medical procedures, as well as massage treatment modalities (botanical medicine, physical medicine, counseling & health psychotherapy). The CCMEX examinations are developed according to all the guidelines set forth in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing.

After graduation from the accredited Massage Therapy college and passage of Part II - Clinical Science Examinations, candidates apply to one of the jurisdictions that have laws that enable licensed Massage Therapists to serve their communities as providers of care in Canada. Licensed Massage Therapists are required to obtain continuing education and are subject to peer review.

Massage Therapy can play a vital, cost-effective role in the healthcare system:

1.
Massage Therapists are care providers who treat patients for a variety of conditions, using therapies that are non-invasive, safe, and effective. More patients are demanding these kinds of treatment options, and the cost of Massage Therapy care is minimal when compared to the skyrocketing costs of drugs.

2.
Because Massage Therapy places significant emphasis on prevention (not merely on screening for pre-existing conditions), it can help stem the increasing incidence of chronic disease. For a small expenditure now, significant costs can be prevented later.

3.
Massage Therapy provides vital adjunctive care when a patient is being treated by a medical doctor for a serious condition. For example, Massage Therapy can help allay the severe side effects of medication and can provide support for better healing. A study done recently showed that this valuable care accounts for only 2% of the cost of other treatments.

4.
Massage Therapist’s can meet the growing shortage of healthcare providers in rural areas. Efforts are under way to allow Massage Therapists to be granted the same kinds of loan repayment options to encourage participation in rural, veteran’s, and Indian health programs that are available for MDs, DCs, DOs, and other eligible providers.

5.
A patient who is rushed through appointments and feels that her/his doctor does not listen is more likely to file a lawsuit in the case of a mistake than is a patient who feels a respectful partnership with her/his physician. Massage Therapists spend a great deal of time listening to their patients, attending to their emotional, mental, and spiritual needs as well as to their physical symptoms. Cases of malpractice are extremely rare in the Massage Therapy profession.

MASSAGE THERAPY ORGANIZATION WEBSITES

Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC)

Conseil des Examinateurs en Massothérapie du Québec (CEMQ)

Le Syndicat Professionnel des Techniciens en Thérapie Manuelle du Québec (SPTTMQ)

Collège de Massothérapie du Québec a Montreal (CMQM)

Le Syndicat Professionnel des Massothérapeutes du Québec (SPMQ)

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

During the first 2 ½ - 3 years of massage school, the education of Massage Therapy follows a path similar to that of physiotherapists. Students in both allopathic and Massage Therapy colleges receive extensive training in the medical sciences, and in physical, and clinical diagnosis. Both receive training in emergency procedures, public health, and principles of pharmacology. The Massage Therapy colleges use standard medical texts for this phase of the training. The paths of Massage Therapy education and allopathic medical education diverge after this point. Physiotherapists learn how to work with patients who have been prescribed drugs from MDs and or refer for surgery. Massage Therapists learn how to help patients who have been prescribed drugs from MDs. With physical medicine (e.g., hydrotherapy, soft tissue massage, osseous manipulation, etc.) mind-body medicine also refers to NDs, DCs, DOs, and Psychotherapists.

Four keys differences distinguish the Massage therapy approach from the approach used by allopathic physiotherapists:

Emphasis on prevention

Search for and treatment of the cause of illness (as compared to an approach that treats the symptoms of the illness)

Individualized treatment (e.g. two patients being treated for the same pathology may have completely different treatment protocols)

A goal of removing obstacles to the body’s own innate healing processes (as compared to the idea that “cure” must come from external sources)

Massage Therapist License Requirements

Massage Therapy: Initial License Requirements

Submit a massage therapist license application & pay the required license fee;
Possess a good moral and professional reputation;
Be physically and mentally fit to practice massage therapy;
Graduate from a massage therapy college that is accredited by the Council or another such accrediting agency recognized by the federal government; or graduate from a foreign country osteopathic medical college that possesses equivalent qualifications; and
Successfully complete the Canadian Council of Massage Therapy Examiners (CCME) examinations.


The Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC)'s mission is to ensure the high quality of alternative medicine education in Canada through the voluntary accreditation of four-year, graduate-level programs in alternative medicine. Students and graduates of programs accredited or pre-accredited (candidacy) by AMECC are eligible to apply for the osteopathic licensing examinations administered by the Canadian Council of Massage Therapist Examiners (CCME).

Founded in 1991, CCME is accepted as the programmatic accrediting agency for osteopathic medical education by the osteopathic college and programs in Canada, by the Canadian National Massage Therapy Professional Syndicates CNMPS, and by AMECC. CCME advocates for high standards in Massage therapy education, and its grant of accreditation to a college or program indicates prospective students and the public may have confidence in the college or program. The CCME is the national accrediting agency for programs leading to the Massage Therapist degree.

An accreditation handbook, containing CCME standards, policies, procedures, and governing documents, is available for $20, prepaid. A free PDF version is available by e-mail upon request. The PDF file may be opened and printed with Adobe Acrobat Reader, a free download.

CCME also certifies postdoctoral programs in Massage Therapy. Among these programs are massage therapy residencies that provide licensed massage therapists with postgraduate training in massage therapy family care and other specialties. A manual containing CCME's standards for residency programs may be ordered for $15, prepaid. A free PDF version is available by e-mail.

CCME is a member of the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) and abides by the CPMDQ Code of Good Practice.

The accredited and candidate of Massage therapy programs, as well as the certified residency programs, are listed on the links page. After accessing the links page, click the name of the program or its logo to go to the Website for the college or university that offers the program.

For frequently asked questions, click "FAQs" on the menu.

CCMEs next meeting will be held April 9& 10, 2005, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

1. Can you compare the colleges? Which one is best?

We treat as confidential the information we receive from massage therapy programs. All accredited programs have our recommendation, but we do not rank them. Each massage therapy college has unique qualities. We encourage prospective students to visit the campuses and to participate in the schools' student-for-a-day programs.

2. Does CCME recognize home-study schools or external-degree programs?

Many correspondence schools offer Massage therapists degrees or diplomas. Some are exempt from provincial regulations because they claim a religious purpose or they do not recruit students from their home provinces. No correspondence programs prepare students for practice as licensed massage therapy physicians, no programs are eligible for affiliation with our agency. It is not illegal for those who obtain massage therapist, degrees from correspondence schools to use the initials after their names; they may not, however, legally represent themselves as physicians or engage in the practice of medicine unless they are otherwise licensed as medical practitioners. Although correspondence courses can be effective in many disciplines, massage therapy licensing agencies believe they are not effective in massage therapy for preparing students as physicians. The Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) consider those who obtain Massage Therapists, degrees from correspondence schools not to be part of the massage therapy medical profession.

4. What does "candidate for accreditation" mean?

Candidacy is a status of affiliation with us that indicates a massage therapy medicine program satisfies our agency's eligibility requirements — e.g., that it is properly organized, is adequately supported financially, has good facilities and a qualified faculty, offers an appropriate curriculum, and accurately represents itself to prospective students. Candidacy, however, is not accreditation and does not ensure eventual accreditation. We grant candidacy when a program meets our eligibility requirements, complies with our standards to the degree expected for its stage of development, and is progressing toward accreditation. If it does not achieve accreditation within five years, the program loses affiliation with us for at least one year and until deficiencies are corrected. A new program may apply for candidacy at any time, but CCME will not grant candidacy until after at least its first academic year with students enrolled full time. A massage therapy program may not be accredited until it has graduated its first class. Students and graduates of candidate programs are eligible to apply for the licensing examinations, administered by the Canadian Council of Massotherapeutic Examiners CCME’s branch of each province.

5. What criteria does CCME use in evaluating massage therapy programs?

The evaluation process involves a comprehensive self-study by the program, periodic visits to the campus by CCME teams, and ongoing monitoring. Evaluation teams have three or more trained members, with at least one a practicing massage therapist physician, another a member of the Council, and another not affiliated with the massage therapy profession, its colleges, or CCME. Our Handbook of Accreditation for Massage Therapy Programs , contains our objectives, eligibility requirements, standards, policies, procedures, Articles of Incorporation, and Bylaws. The handbook is available for on-site review and photocopying (no permission needed) at the library or an administrative office of each program affiliated with us, or it may be ordered for $20, prepaid: free by e-mail upon request.

6. Where may Massage Therapists practice?

Three provinces allows the practice of massage therapy: British Columbia, New Brunswick and Ontario, have licensing laws for massage therapists. The scope of practice varies from province to province. In provinces without massage therapy licensing laws, many who hold the massage therapist.,. degree also hold other degrees, such as the Doctor of Naturopathy, Doctor of Osteopathy, Doctor of Chiropractic, Masters in Oriental Medicine degree, or M.Ds., and they practice under licenses for those professions. Others offer services that do not violate their provinces medical practice acts. Most massage therapy physicians are not in the provinces that regulate the profession.

7. How is CCME organized?

CCME was incorporated in August 1991 under the Nonprofit Corporation Act and is recognized by the Canadian Internal Revenue Service as a Professional Syndicate nonprofit organization. Board members are elected by the board itself, who are also the organization's only voting members. Presently, two of CCME's eleven board members are public members; a public member is not affiliated in any way with the massage therapy profession. The board has three positions for institutional member representatives, who are elected rotationally for three-year terms from among administrators and faculty members at the five accredited and candidate massage therapy programs. Our Articles of Incorporation also require from four to six profession members, who must be licensed massage therapist physicians. Six profession members currently serve on the board.

8. How does someone start a new massage therapy college?

To site a new massage therapy program within an existing college or university is preferable to beginning a freestanding massage therapy college, unless the organizing group has the necessary assets and extensive experience in higher education administration. CCME can refer organizations with the potential for developing a new program to consultants. Any new program, to qualify for accreditation, would likely need to be in a state or province that licenses massage therapy physicians, because students do their clinical training primarily under practicing massage therapy physicians. Additionally, provincial authorities probably would not approve a college's request to grant the massage therapist degree in a province that does not allow the practice of massage therapy.

09. May I be licensed in the Canada if I attend an overseas massage therapy college?

Because standards for massage therapy education also exists other than in Canada, students who graduate from massage therapy colleges in other countries are eligible to apply for the Canadian Council of Massage Therapist Examiners CCME, examinations. The exams are administered twice a year at the provincial level by the branch of it’s Province. Students who attend an overseas school may have some course credits accepted for transfer to a Canadian school if the foreign school is a graduate-level institution and governmentally recognized. If you plan to spend the first year or two of massage therapy studies at a foreign school, you should first check with one of the Canadian Massage Therapy colleges to learn if any credits may be transferred later.

Pour visionner le site original avec ses liens Canadian Council of Massotherapeutic Examiners (CCME)
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Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners (CCNE)
Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners
(CCNE)

Details on the education and examination requirements for naturopathic doctors and reasons why naturopathic medicine can play a vital role in the healthcare system.

Interest in alternative medicine has grown significantly over the last decade, creating a demand for alternative practitioners. Three elements must be present to ensure that these healthcare professionals do not pose a threat to public health:

1.
Practitioners must be educated at medical colleges that have been accredited by an agency recognized by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC);

2.
Practitioners must be examined by a national examining board that sets high standards for eligibility and provides standardized test administration; board examinations must be developed in accordance with national testing standards; and

3.
Practitioners must be licensed, required to take continuing education, and subject to peer review.

One naturopathic medical college in Canada is currently accredited by the Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners (CCNE). The CCNE is the only naturopathic accrediting body recognized by the Alternative Medecine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC).

The education of naturopathic doctors (NDs) follows a path similar to that of medical doctors (MDs). Applicants enter naturopathic medical school after receiving a baccalaureate degree (usually pre-med) from a four-year college. Students complete two years of post-graduate basic science coursework then have two to three years of didactic and clinical training, including time spent in supervised patient care.

The Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners (CCNE) uses the CCNEX to examine all naturopathic physicians who want to be licensed in provinces that license NDs. The Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners (CCNEX) are criterion-referenced examinations. Five Part I - Basic Science Examinations cover anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, immunology, and pathology. The Part I Examinations are taken after the second year of training. Eleven Part II - Clinical Science Examinations cover diagnosis using physical examination and lab testing, emergency and medical procedures, as well as naturopathic treatment modalities (botanical medicine, homeopathy, clinical nutrition, physical medicine, counseling & health psychology). The CCNEX examinations are developed according to all the guidelines set forth in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing.

After graduation from the accredited naturopathic medical college and passage of Part II - Clinical Science Examinations, candidates apply to one of the jurisdictions that have laws that enable licensed naturopathic physicians to serve their communities as providers of primary care medicine in Canada. Licensed NDs are required to obtain continuing education and are subject to peer review.

Naturopathic medicine can play a vital, cost-effective role in the healthcare system:

1.
Naturopathic physicians are primary care providers who treat patients for a variety of conditions, using therapies that are non-invasive, safe, and effective. More patients are demanding these kinds of treatment options, and the cost of naturopathic care is minimal when compared to the skyrocketing costs of drugs.

2.
Because naturopathic medicine places significant emphasis on prevention (not merely on screening for pre-existing conditions), it can help stem the increasing incidence of chronic disease. For a small expenditure now, significant costs can be prevented later.

3.
Naturopathic medicine provides vital adjunctive care when a patient is being treated by a medical doctor for a serious condition. For example, naturopathic medicine can help alleviate the severe side effects of chemotherapy and can provide support for better healing. A study done recently showed that this valuable care accounts for only 2% of the cost of cancer treatment.

4.
NDs can meet the growing shortage of healthcare providers in rural areas. Efforts are under way to allow naturopathic doctors to be granted the same kinds of loan repayment options to encourage participation in rural, veteran’s, and Indian health programs that are available for MDs, DOs, DCs, and other eligible providers.

5.
A patient who is rushed through appointments and feels that her/his doctor does not listen is more likely to file a lawsuit in the case of a mistake than is a patient who feels a respectful partnership with her/his physician. NDs spend a great deal of time listening to their patients, attending to their emotional, mental, and spiritual needs as well as to their physical symptoms. Cases of malpractice are extremely rare in the naturopathic profession.

NATUROPATHIC ORGANIZATION WEBSITES

Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC)

Naturopathic Medicine Council of Canada (NMCC)

Conseil des Examinateurs en Naturopathie du Québec (CENQ)

Collège de Naturopathie du Québec a Montreal (CNQM)

Le Syndicat Professionnel des Naturopathes du Québec (SPNQ)

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

During the first 2 ½ - 3 years of medical school, the education of naturopathic doctors (NDs) follows a path similar to that of medical doctors (MDs). Students in both allopathic and naturopathic medical colleges receive extensive training in the biomedical sciences, and in physical, clinical, and lab diagnosis. Both receive training in emergency procedures, public health, and principles of pharmacology. The naturopathic colleges use standard medical texts for this phase of the training. The paths of naturopathic medical education and allopathic medical education diverge after this point. MDs learn how to prescribe drugs and perform or refer for surgery. NDs learn how to use herbs, clinical nutrition, physical medicine (e.g., hydrotherapy, soft tissue massage, osseous manipulation, etc.), homeopathy, and mind-body medicine.

Four keys differences distinguish the naturopathic approach from the approach used by allopathic doctors (MDs):

Emphasis on prevention

Search for and treatment of the cause of illness (as compared to an approach that treats the symptoms of the illness)

Individualized treatment (e.g. two patients being treated for the same pathology may have completely different treatment protocols)

A goal of removing obstacles to the body’s own innate healing processes (as compared to the idea that “cure” must come from external sources)

Naturopathic License Requirements

Naturopathic Doctor: Initial License Requirements

Submit a naturopathic license application & pay the required license fee;
Possess a good moral and professional reputation;
Be physically and mentally fit to practice naturopathic medicine;
Graduate from a naturopathic medical college that is accredited by the Council or another such accrediting agency recognized by the federal government; or graduate from a foreign country naturopathic medical college that possesses equivalent qualifications; and
Successfully complete the Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners (CCNE) examinations.

The Naturopathic Medicine Council of Canada (NMCC)'s mission is to ensure the high quality of naturopathic medical education in Canada through the voluntary accreditation of four-year, graduate-level programs in naturopathic medicine. Students and graduates of programs accredited or pre-accredited (candidacy) by NMCC are eligible to apply for the naturopathic licensing examinations administered by the Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners (CCNE).

Founded in 1991, CCNE is accepted as the programmatic accrediting agency for naturopathic medical education by the naturopathic colleges and programs in Canada, by the Canadian national naturopathic professional syndicates, and by NMCC. CCNE advocates for high standards in naturopathic education, and its grant of accreditation to a college or program indicates prospective students and the public may have confidence in the college or program. The CCNE is the national accrediting agency for programs leading to the Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine (N.D. or N.M.D.) or Doctor of Naturopathy (N.D.) degree.

An accreditation handbook, containing CCNE standards, policies, procedures, and governing documents, is available for $20, prepaid. A free PDF version is available by e-mail upon request. The PDF file may be opened and printed with Adobe Acrobat Reader, a free download.

CCNE also certifies postdoctoral programs in naturopathic medicine. Among these programs are naturopathic residencies that provide licensed naturopathic physicians with postgraduate training in naturopathic family care and other specialties. A manual containing CCNE's standards for residency programs may be ordered for $15, prepaid. A free PDF version is available by e-mail.

CCNE is a member of the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) and abides by the CPMDQ Code of Good Practice.

The accredited and candidate naturopathic medicine programs, as well as the certified residency programs, are listed on the links page. After accessing the links page, click the name of the program or its logo to go to the Website for the college or university that offers the program.

For frequently asked questions, click "FAQs" on the menu.

CCNEs next meeting will be held April 9& 10, 2005, Montreal, Québec, Canada.

1. Can you compare the colleges? Which one is best?

We treat as confidential the information we receive from naturopathic medicine programs. All accredited programs have our recommendation, but we do not rank them. Each naturopathic college has unique qualities. We encourage prospective students to visit the campuses and to participate in the schools' student-for-a-day programs.

2. Does CCNE recognize home-study schools or external-degree programs?

Many correspondence schools offer N.D. or N.M.D degrees or diplomas. Some are exempt from state regulations because they claim a religious purpose or they do not recruit students from their home states. Not all correspondence programs prepare students for practice as licensed naturopathic physicians, not all programs are eligible for affiliation with our agency. It is not illegal for those who obtain N.D. or N.M.D. degrees from correspondence schools to use the initials after their names; they may not, however, legally represent themselves as physicians or engage in the practice of medicine unless they are otherwise licensed as medical practitioners. Although correspondence courses can be effective in many disciplines, naturopathic licensing agencies believe they are only partly effective in many disciplines of Naturopathy for preparing students as physicians. The Naturopathic Medicine Council of Canada (NMCC) and the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) consider those who obtain N.D. or N.M.D. degrees from correspondence schools to be part of the naturopathic medical profession providing the candidate passes the CCNEX exams in person. Many disciplines of naturopathy may not be taken by correspondence, such as; osteopathy, massage therapy, ect…Others may be , but all examinations are in person , supervised by The Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners (CCNE) and follow the norms of the CCNE. Make sure the naturopathic program you which to follow is accredited by the CCNE.

3. Is there a difference between the N.D. and the N.M.D. degree?

Universities and colleges may choose to call the naturopathic degree they confer either the "Doctor of Naturopathy" or the "Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine" degree. These are two different names for the same degree. By either name, the degree is usually abbreviated "N.D.," but an institution that refers to its naturopathic credential as the "Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine" degree may abbreviate it either "N.D." or "N.M.D." Presently, all colleges and universities with accredited or candidate naturopathic medicine programs confer the Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine degree or, in Canada, the Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine diploma. In all provinces that regulate naturopathic medicine, naturopathic physicians use the N.D. initials after their names. In Arizona, they may use either the N.D. or N.M.D. initials; the different sets of initials do not indicate a difference in scope of practice, but only a preference by the individual physicians. The N.D. initials are the ones more widely associated with the naturopathic medical profession and are the only ones used in the corporate seals of both the Naturopathic Medicine Council of Canada (NMCC) and the Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners.

4. What does "candidate for accreditation" mean?

Candidacy is a status of affiliation with us that indicates a naturopathic medicine program satisfies our agency's eligibility requirements — e.g., that it is properly organized, is adequately supported financially, has good facilities and a qualified faculty, offers an appropriate curriculum, and accurately represents itself to prospective students. Candidacy, however, is not accreditation and does not ensure eventual accreditation. We grant candidacy when a program meets our eligibility requirements, complies with our standards to the degree expected for its stage of development, and is progressing toward accreditation. If it does not achieve accreditation within five years, the program loses affiliation with us for at least one year and until deficiencies are corrected. A new program may apply for candidacy at any time, but CCNE will not grant candidacy until after at least its first academic year with students enrolled full time. A naturopathic medicine program may not be accredited until it has graduated its first class. Students and graduates of candidate programs are eligible to apply for the Naturopathic Medicine Council of Canada (NMCC) licensing examinations, administered by the Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners CCNE’s branch of each province.

5. What criteria does CCNE use in evaluating naturopathic medicine programs?

The evaluation process involves a comprehensive self-study by the program, periodic visits to the campus by CCNE teams, and ongoing monitoring. Evaluation teams have three or more trained members, with at least one a practicing naturopathic physician, another a member of the Council, and another not affiliated with the naturopathic profession, its colleges, or CCNE. Our Handbook of Accreditation for Naturopathic Medicine Programs , contains our objectives, eligibility requirements, standards, policies, procedures, Articles of Incorporation, and Bylaws. The handbook is available for on-site review and photocopying (no permission needed) at the library or an administrative office of each program affiliated with us, or it may be ordered for $20, prepaid: free by e-mail upon request.

6. Where may N.D.,’s practice?

Four provinces allow the practice of naturopathic medicine: British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Oregon, Saskatchewan, have licensing laws for naturopathic doctors. The scope of practice varies from province to province. In provinces without naturopathic licensing laws, many who hold the N.D. degree also hold other degrees, such as the Doctor of Osteopathy, Doctor of Chiropractic, or Masters in Oriental Medicine degree, and they practice under licenses for those professions. Others offer services that do not violate their provinces medical practice acts. Most naturopathic physicians are not in the provinces that regulate the profession.

7. How is CCNE organized?

CCNE was incorporated in August 1991 under the Nonprofit Corporation Act and is recognized by the Canadian Internal Revenue Service as a Professional syndicate nonprofit organization. Board members are elected by the board itself, who are also the organization's only voting members. Presently, two of CCNE's eleven board members are public members; a public member is not affiliated in any way with the naturopathic profession. The board has three positions for institutional member representatives, who are elected rotationally for three-year terms from among administrators and faculty members at the five accredited and candidate naturopathic medicine programs. Our Articles of Incorporation also require from four to six profession members, who must be licensed naturopathic physicians. Six profession members currently serve on the board.

8. How does someone start a new naturopathic college?

To site a new naturopathic program within an existing college or university is preferable to beginning a freestanding naturopathic medical college, unless the organizing group has the necessary assets and extensive experience in higher education administration. CCNE can refer organizations with the potential for developing a new program to consultants. Any new program, to qualify for accreditation, would likely need to be in a state or province that licenses naturopathic physicians, because students do their clinical training primarily under practicing naturopathic physicians. Additionally, provincial authorities probably would not approve a college's request to grant the N.D. degree in a province that does not allow the practice of naturopathic medicine.

09. May I be licensed in the Canada if I attend an overseas naturopathic college?

Because no international standards for naturopathic education exist other than in Canada, students who graduate from naturopathic colleges in other countries are not eligible to apply for the Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners CCNE, examinations. The exams are administered twice a year at the provincial level by the branch of it’s Province. Students who attend an overseas school may have some course credits accepted for transfer to a Canadian school if the foreign school is a graduate-level institution and governmentally recognized. If you plan to spend the first year or two of naturopathic studies at a foreign school, you should first check with one of the Canadian naturopathic colleges to learn if any credits may be transferred later.

10. May I be licensed in the United States if I attend naturopathic college in Canada, and vice versa?

If you graduate from a CCNE-recognized college in Canada, some states will accept your licensing application, but several will not. This is because private colleges in Canada do not all confer degrees but "diplomas," e.g., the Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine diploma. Quebec is the only province which confers the degree of Doctor of Naturopathy, N.D., which is a first cycle Doctorate "degree." Some state laws have language that specifically requires an N.D. "degree." U.S. students who plan to attend naturopathic college in Canada should first check with the naturopathic licensing agencies in the states where they will practice to make sure they can apply for a license with a Canadian diploma.

11. What is the difference between CCNE and the other organizations that accredit naturopathic programs?

CCNE is the organization that accredits programs which prepare students to become licensed naturopathic physicians. It is the accrediting agency accepted by the Canadian professional associations for licensed naturopathic doctors, and it is the agency recognized by the Naturopathic Medicine Council of Canada (NMCC). CCNE is also the only naturopathic accreditor with membership in the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC). Other naturopathic accrediting agencies accredit schools that do not prepare students to practice as licensed naturopathic physicians. None is recognized by the AMECC, and none of the schools or programs they accredit has institutional accreditation from a recognized regional accrediting agency. Comparing the published standards, policies, procedures, and bylaws of accrediting agencies is one way to determine their differences. For CCNE, these documents are in its Handbook.

Pour visionner le site original avec ses liens Canadian Council of Naturopathic Examiners (CCNE)
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Canadian Council of Psychotherapeutic Examiners (CCPE)
Canadian Council of Psychotherapeutic Examiners
(CCPE)

Details on the education and examination requirements for Psychotherapists and reasons why psychotherapeutic medicine can play a vital role in the healthcare system.

Interest in alternative medicine has grown significantly over the last decade, creating a demand for alternative practitioners. Three elements must be present to ensure that these healthcare professionals do not pose a threat to public health:

1.
Practitioners must be educated at medical colleges that have been accredited by an agency recognized by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC);

2.
Practitioners must be examined by a national examining board that sets high standards for eligibility and provides standardized test administration; board examinations must be developed in accordance with national testing standards; and

3.
Practitioners must be licensed, required to take continuing education, and subject to peer review.

One psychotherapeutic college in Canada is currently accredited by the Canadian Council of Psychotherapeutic Examiners (CCPE)

The CCPE is the only psychotherapeutic accrediting body in psychotherapy recognized by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC).
The education of Psychotherapists follows a path similar to that of a Psychologists. Applicants enter psychotherapy school after receiving a baccalaureate degree from a four-year college. Students complete two years of post-graduate then have two to three years of didactic and clinical training, including time spent in supervised patient care totaling 1500 hours.

The Canadian Council of Psychotherapeutic Examiners (CCPE) uses the CCPEX to examine all psychotherapists who want to be licensed in provinces that license.. The Canadian Council of Psychotherapeutic Examiners (CCPEX) exams are criterion-referenced examinations. Five Part I - Basic Examinations cover the approaches of the applicant. The Part I Examinations are taken after the second year of training. Part II - Clinical Examinations cover diagnosis using examination, emergency procedures, as well as psychotherapeutic treatment modalities, counseling & health psychology. The CCPEX examinations are developed according to all the guidelines set forth in the standards for educational Testing.

After graduation from the accredited psychotherapeutic college and passage of Part II - Clinical Examinations, candidates apply to one of the jurisdictions that have laws that enable licensed psychotherapist to serve their communities as providers of psychotherapeutic care in Canada. Licensed psychotherapists are required to obtain continuing education and are subject to peer review.

Psychotherapeutic medicine can play a vital, cost-effective role in the healthcare system:

1.
Psychotherapists are care providers who treat patients for a variety of conditions, using therapies that are non-invasive, safe, and effective. More patients are demanding these kinds of treatment options, and the cost of psychotherapeutic care is minimal when compared to the skyrocketing costs of drugs.

2.
Because psychotherapy places significant emphasis on treating the cause (not merely on screening for pre-existing symptoms), it can help stem the increasing incidence of chronic problems. For a small expenditure now, significant costs can be prevented later.

3.
Psychotherapeutic provides vital adjunctive care when a patient is being treated by a medical doctor for a serious condition. For example, psychotherapeutic care can help allay the severe side effects of medications and can provide support for better healing. A study done recently showed that this valuable care accounts for only 2% of the cost of psychiatry treatments.

4.
Psychotherapists can meet the growing shortage of healthcare providers in rural areas. Efforts are under way to allow psychotherapists to be granted the same kinds of loan repayment options to encourage participation in rural, veteran’s, and Indian health programs that are available for MDs, DOs, DCs, and other eligible providers.

5.
A patient who is rushed through appointments and feels that her/his doctor does not listen is more likely to file a lawsuit in the case of a mistake than is a patient who feels a respectful partnership with her/his therapist. Psychotherapists spend a great deal of time listening to their patients, attending to their emotional, mental, and spiritual needs as well as to their physical symptoms. Cases of malpractice are extremely rare in the psychotherapeutic profession.

PSYCHOTHERAPIE ORGANIZATION WEBSITES

Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC)

Conseil des Examinateurs en Psychothérapie du Québec (CEPQ)

Le Syndicat Professionnel des Psychothérapeutes du Québec

Collège de Psychothérapie du Québec a Montreal (CPQM)

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

During the first 2 ½ - 3 years of college, the education of Psychotherapists follows a path similar to that of a psychologist. Students in both allopathic and alternative medicine colleges receive extensive training in the biomedical sciences, and in physical, clinical, and lab diagnosis. Both receive training in emergency procedures, public health, and principles of pharmacology. The alternative medicine colleges use standard medical texts for this phase of the training. The paths of alternative medicine education and allopathic medical education diverge after this point. Psychologists and Psychiatrists learn how to prescribe drugs or refer for prescriptions. Psychotherapists learn how to help their patients with scientific tools and mindbody medicine.

Four keys differences distinguish the psychotherapeutic approach from the approach used by Psychologists and Psychiatrists:

Emphasis on prevention

Search for and treatment of the cause of illness (as compared to an approach that treats the symptoms of the illness)

Individualized treatment (e.g. two patients being treated for the same pathology may have completely different treatment protocols)

A goal of removing obstacles to the body’s own innate healing processes (as compared to the idea that “cure” must come from external sources)

Psychotherapists License Requirements

Psychotherapists: Initial License Requirements

Submit a psychotherapeutic license application & pay the required license fee;
Possess a good moral and professional reputation;
Be physically and mentally fit to practice psychotherapeutic medicine;
Graduate from a psychotherapeutic college that is accredited by the Council or another such accrediting agency recognized by the federal government; or graduate from a foreign country psychotherapeutic college that possesses equivalent qualifications; and
Successfully complete the Canadian Council of Psychotherapeutic Examiners (CCPE) examinations.

The Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC)'s mission is to ensure the high quality of alternative medicine education in Canada through the voluntary accreditation of four-year, graduate-level programs in psychotherapy. Students and graduates of programs accredited or pre-accredited (candidacy) by AMECC are eligible to apply for the psychotherapeutic licensing examinations administered by the Canadian Council of Psychotherapeutic Examiners (CCPE).

Founded in 1991, CCPE is accepted as the programmatic accrediting agency for psychotherapeutic education by the psychotherapeutic college and programs in Canada, by the Canadian National Psychotherapy Professional Syndicates CNPPS, and by AMECC. CNPPS advocates for high standards in psychotherapy education, and its grant of accreditation to a college or program indicates prospective students and the public may have confidence in the college or program. The CCPE is the national accrediting agency for programs leading to the Doctor of Psychotherapy degree.

An accreditation handbook, containing CCPE standards, policies, procedures, and governing documents, is available for $20, prepaid. A free PDF version is available by e-mail upon request. The PDF file may be opened and printed with Adobe Acrobat Reader, a free download.

CCPE also certifies postdoctoral programs in psychotherapy. Among these programs are psychotherapeutic residencies that provide licensed Psychotherapist with postgraduate training in psychotherapeutic family care and other specialties. A manual containing CCPE's standards for residency programs may be ordered for $15, prepaid. A free PDF version is available by e-mail.

CCPE is a member of the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) and abides by the CPMDQ Code of Good Practice.

The accredited and candidate of psychotherapeutic programs, as well as the certified residency programs, are listed on the links page. After accessing the links page, click the name of the program or its logo to go to the Website for the college or university that offers the program.

For frequently asked questions, click "FAQs" on the menu.

CCPEs next meeting will be held April 9& 10, 2005, Montreal, Québec, Canada.

01. Can you compare the colleges? Which one is best?

We treat as confidential the information we receive from psychotherapy programs. All accredited programs have our recommendation, but we do not rank them. Each psychotherapeutic college has unique qualities. We encourage prospective students to visit the campuses and to participate in the schools' student-for-a-day programs.

02. Does CCPE recognize home-study schools or external-degree programs?

Many correspondence schools offer psychotherapy degrees or diplomas. Some are exempt from provincial regulations because they claim a religious purpose or they do not recruit students from their home province. Not all correspondence programs prepare students for practice as licensed psychotherapist, not all programs are eligible for affiliation with our agency. It is not illegal for those who obtain psychotherapy degrees from correspondence schools to use the initials after their names; they may not, however, legally represent themselves as psychologists, psychiatrists or engage in the practice of medicine unless they are otherwise licensed as medical practitioners. Although correspondence courses can be effective in many disciplines, psychotherapy licensing agencies believe they are effective in many disciplines of Psychotherapy for preparing students as Psychotherapists. The Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) consider those who obtain psychotherapy degrees from correspondence schools to be part of the psychotherapeutic profession providing the candidate passes the CCPEX exams in person.

03. What does "candidate for accreditation" mean?

Candidacy is a status of affiliation with us that indicates a psychotherapy program satisfies our agency's eligibility requirements — e.g., that it is properly organized, is adequately supported financially, has good facilities and a qualified faculty, offers an appropriate curriculum, and accurately represents itself to prospective students. Candidacy, however, is not accreditation and does not ensure eventual accreditation. We grant candidacy when a program meets our eligibility requirements, complies with our standards to the degree expected for its stage of development, and is progressing toward accreditation. If it does not achieve accreditation within five years, the program loses affiliation with us for at least one year and until deficiencies are corrected. A new program may apply for candidacy at any time, but CCPE will not grant candidacy until after at least its first academic year with students enrolled full time. A psychotherapy program may not be accredited until it has graduated its first class. Students and graduates of candidate programs are eligible to apply for the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC) licensing examinations, administered by the Canadian Council of Psychotherapeutic Examiners CCPE’s branch of each province.

04. What criteria does CCPE use in evaluating psychotherapy programs?

The evaluation process involves a comprehensive self-study by the program, periodic visits to the campus by CCPE teams, and ongoing monitoring. Evaluation teams have three or more trained members, with at least one a practicing psychotherapist, another a member of the Council, and another not affiliated with the psychotherapy, its colleges, or CCPE. Our Handbook of Accreditation for Psychotherapeutic Programs , contains our objectives, eligibility requirements, standards, policies, procedures, Articles of Incorporation, and Bylaws. The handbook is available for on-site review and photocopying (no permission needed) at the library or an administrative office of each program affiliated with us, or it may be ordered for $20, prepaid: free by e-mail upon request.

05. Where may Psychotherapists practice?

Four provinces allow the practice of naturopathic medicine: British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Oregon, Saskatchewan, have licensing laws for psychotherapy. The scope of practice varies from province to province. In provinces without psychotherapy licensing laws, many who hold the psychotherapy. degree also hold other degrees, such as the Doctor of Osteopathy, Doctor of Chiropractic, Doctor of Naturopathy or Masters in Oriental Medicine degree, and they practice under licenses for those professions. Others offer services that do not violate their provinces medical practice acts. Most psychotherapists are not in the provinces that regulate the profession.

06. How is CCPE organized?

CCPE was incorporated in August 1991 under the Nonprofit Corporation Act and is recognized by the Canadian Internal Revenue Service as a Professional Syndicate nonprofit organization. Board members are elected by the board itself, who are also the organization's only voting members. Presently, two of CCPE's eleven board members are public members; a public member is not affiliated in any way with the psychotherapeutic profession. The board has three positions for institutional member representatives, who are elected rotationally for three-year terms from among administrators and faculty members at the five accredited and candidate psychotherapeutic programs. Our Articles of Incorporation also require from four to six profession members, who must be licensed psychotherapist. Six profession members currently serve on the board.

07. How does someone start a new psychotherapeutic college?

To site a psychotherapeutic program within an existing college or university is preferable to beginning a freestanding psychotherapeutic college, unless the organizing group has the necessary assets and extensive experience in higher education administration. CCPE can refer organizations with the potential for developing a new program to consultants. Any new program, to qualify for accreditation, would likely need to be in a state or province that licenses psychotherapists, because students do their clinical training primarily under practicing psychotherapists. Additionally, provincial authorities probably would not approve a college's request to grant the psychotherapist degree in a province that does not allow the practice of psychotherapeutic medicine.

08. May I be licensed in the Canada if I attend an overseas psychotherapeutic college?

Because international standards for psychotherapy education exists other than in Canada, students who graduate from psychotherapy colleges in other countries are eligible to apply for the Canadian Council of Psychotherapeutic Examiners CCPE, examinations. The exams are administered twice a year at the provincial level by the branch of it’s Province. Students who attend an overseas school may have some course credits accepted for transfer to a Canadian school if the foreign school is a graduate-level institution and governmentally recognized. If you plan to spend the first year or two of psychotherapy studies at a foreign school, you should first check with one of the Canadian psychotherapeutic colleges to learn if any credits may be transferred later.

09. May I be licensed in the United States if I attend psychotherapists college in Canada, and vice versa?

If you graduate from a CCPE-recognized college in Canada, some states will accept your licensing application, but several will not. If you intend to attend a psychotherapeutic college in Canada you should first check with the psychotherapists licensing agencies in the states where they will practice to make sure they can apply for a license with a Canadian diploma.

10. What is the difference between CCPE and the other organizations that accredit psychotherapeutic programs?

CCPE is the organization that accredits programs which prepare students to become licensed psychotherapists. It is the accrediting agency accepted by the Canadian Professional Syndicates for licensed psychotherapists, and it is the agency recognized by the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC). CCPE is also the only Psychotherapeutic accreditor with membership in the Alternative Medicine Examiners Council of Canada (AMECC). Other psychotherapeutic accrediting agencies accredit schools that do not prepare students to practice as licensed psychotherapists. None is recognized by the AMECC, and none of the schools or programs they accredit has institutional accreditation from a recognized regional accrediting agency. Comparing the published standards, policies, procedures, and bylaws of accrediting agencies is one way to determine their differences. For CCPE, these documents are in its Handbook.

Pour visionner le site original avec ses liens Canadian Council of Psychotherapeutic Examiners (CCPE)
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